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How to start Kings of War

Kings of War is a fantasy battle game played with miniatures. You collect and command an army of your favourite fantasy figures against an opponents collection of fantasy figures, in a variety of scenarios across different fantasy landscapes. The action takes place on the world of Pannithor, which is the setting for the fantasy games produced by Mantic including Dungeon Saga, Vanguard and Armada. While it may be new to a number of people it does contain familiar elements, such as Dwarves, Elves, Undead and Dragons.

In order to play Kings of War you will need a Rulebook, Army list and of course models. You will find your army list in either the Core Rulebook or another publication called Uncharted Empires. Between both books there are twenty-six army lists so there is much to choose from. A review of the game has already been completed here.

Starter Sets

Uniquely there are two starter sets for Kings of War. Shadows in the North and War in the Holds. Both boxes contain the rulebook and two starting armies of Nightstalkers and Northern Alliance for Shdows in the North. Goblins and Ratkin for War in the holds. Both are great value and can be the perfect introduction for new players.

Books

There are two versions of the rulebook. The Hardback edition which contains the rules, army lists, maps and the background stories to world of Pannithor. The Gamers edition, which is a soft cover book that just contains the game rules and army lists. If you are have an existing collection of miniatures you may prefer to get the book instead of the starter sets.

Other books to consider is Uncharted Empires and Clash of Kings. As mentioned before Uncharted Empires is a book the contains twelve more Army lists for the game. Clash of Kings is an annual publication which has rules updates and new content for the game. While it is not strictly necessary to own Clash of Kings in order to play and enjoy the game, many existing players in the Kings of War community will be using the updated rules to play, particularly in tournaments.

Miniatures

The Army Boxes are excellent value and contain a good variety of troops, to start your collection. They can compliment an existing army or be the beginning of a new force. If you have decided that the armies in the starter sets above are not for you then grabbing one of these with a rulebook can be a great way to start.

There are a good number of miniatures manufacturers and it’s really easy to incorporate your existing collection of miniatures into the game, or to collect an army for Kings of Kings of War outside of Mantics own brand of miniatures. Fantasy miniatures have a number of existing shared concepts, that although each may be unique they are recognisable. You’ll find that figures from Dwarves, undead, elves, orcs and various periods of human history to name but a few are perfectly usable in Kings of War.

Of course it will be up to you how they fit in and which miniatures to use. The army lists in Kings of War and Uncharted Empires should have you covered. For example the “Kingdoms of Men” army list in Uncharted Empires can fit in many figure collections of historical periods from ancients, through medieval to early renaissance. Likewise you’ll find Mantic own miniatures suitable for other fantasy battle and role playing games.

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Starting Warhammer 40,000

Miniature Wargaming, a hobby where you collect and paint figures which you use to represent your forces in games. A game like Warhammer 40,000 can be quite daunting for beginners. This guide will help out anyone who is thinking about starting this great hobby.

Essentials

What you need to start are a few essentials. Miniatures and paint might go without saying, however you will also need a rulebook so you know how to play and a Codex which has the rules specific to your collection of models. Below is a handy guide with the pro’s, cons and a few alternatives later on for your comparison

Warhammer 40,000 Command Edition

Pros : This contains the rules, dice, terrain and miniatures. The miniatures are very detailed and easy to assemble. The Command manual contained has easy to follow guides for assembly of miniatures and rules and missions for your first few games. . This is the most complete starter set for the game system and will offer the best value.

Cons : The only drawback, is if you are not collecting either of the starting forces, in the box.

Warhammer 40,000 Elite Edition

Pros – Good selection of miniatures, dice and a handy guide for painting and playing. Elite manual contains all the rules for all the models in the box, and has good ideas for expansion. Again easy to assemble miniatures with and handy guide. Excellent value and a good way to start the hobby.

Cons – In order to experience the full Warhammer 40,000 hobby, you will still need a rulebook, and terrain. As before if you are not interested in collecting the models in the box, this might not be the best set for you.

Warhammer 40,000 Recruit Edition

Pros – As with the others it contains dice, great models and a handy guide for painting gaming and assembly. Contains all the rules required for using the models in the box, with more ideas for expansion. Great value and perfect for “dipping your toe in”.

Cons – You will need a rulebook and terrain to continue playing. Mainly suited to those people collecting Space Marines or Necrons. So if you are interested in other factions in Warhammer 40,000, this might not be the way to go.

The above starter sets are great for beginning 40k though if you are not interested in the models in the box there are other options available. Luckily the Warhammer 40,000 rulebook is available on its own along with a number of “Start Collecting” boxes for the various different factions of Warhammer 40,000.

Warhammer 40,000 Rulebook

Pros : Detailed and easy to follow rules with examples of how to play. Rich background story with full colour illustrations containing the perfect overview of the Warhammer 40,000 galaxy and factions.

Cons : None. You will need the rules to play the game.



Alternatives



Deadzone

A smaller scale game set in the Warpath universe
Pros – As with Warhammer 40,000 Command Edition it has everything you need to start playing, including rules, scenery, dice and miniatures. A similar experience at a fraction of the cost.  Faster game play and easier understand rules. No need for additional army books.
Cons – The Warhammer 40,000 Brand may be important to you

Star Wars Legion Clone War Core Set

Pros: A tabletop Miniatures Game set in the Star Wars galaxy. Great set of rules and miniatures. Rulebook is available online as PDF from FFG, while the equipment and troop rules can be found on handy cards within each Star Wars Legion boxed set.

Cons: None – who doesn’t like Star Wars? In all seriousness, as before, branding may be important to you.

Necromunda This is a great game set in one of the planets in the Warhammer 40,000 galaxy. A smaller skirmish style games where gangs fight in the confined spaces of a “hive city”.

Pros – Same setting as Warhammer 40,000, in fact some of the components from both settings cane be used in both games.

Cons – None this is a great game.